Paying for Medical Coverage

You and Citi share in the cost of your medical coverage. Citi pays about 70% of the cost, and you pay the rest through payroll contributions. Citi’s philosophy is to support our lower-paid employees by contributing more towards their medical coverage. We believe strongly that all our employees should have access to affordable medical care. Everyone has different needs when it comes to benefits, and it’s important to us to meet those needs.

To support medical coverage more for our lower-paid employees, we look at each employee's benefits eligible pay and group employees into “pay bands." This means that medical benefits cost more for employees who make more, and less for employees who make less. The pay bands, shown here, help create that distribution of costs among our employees.

Citi Pay Band

To determine what you will pay for medical benefits this year, go to Your Benefits Resources™ (YBR™), available through My Total Compensation and Benefits. Costs for 2021 coverage will be available starting October 5, 2020.

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Benefits eligible pay

For most employees, benefits eligible pay means annual base pay as of June 30 plus the annual discretionary incentive award. View a complete definition of benefits eligible pay here. In addition to medical coverage, benefits eligible pay is also used to determine your costs for other benefits, such as disability, life insurance, and eligibility for the Dependent Day Care Spending Account (DCSA) subsidy.

What you pay for medical coverage can also vary depending on many other things, including how many people in your family you cover and other decisions you make:

Need a CheckupNumber of Family Members Covered

Citi offers four coverage categories, each with a different cost: Employee Only; Employee Plus Spouse/Partner; Employee Plus Children; Employee Plus Family.

Need Extra HelpHealth Assessment

You can get a discount on your medical coverage by completing the Live Well Health Assessment during Annual Enrollment.

ClipboardSmoking

We ask you to attest to your tobacco status when you enroll in medical benefits. If you or your enrolled spouse/partner use tobacco products, you’ll pay a penalty on the cost of your medical coverage.

Need an ExpertAetna or Anthem

For Citi’s national medical plans, you have a choice between Aetna and Anthem. In many states, one or the other costs less.

You can find even more detail about employee medical benefits and contributions in the Benefits Handbook.

Pay Increases and Bonuses

Sometimes, a pay raise or a bonus can move you to a different pay band. If this happens, you will pay more for medical coverage the following year. (Your payroll contributions will change with the first paycheck in January; they won’t change in the middle of the year.) This won’t happen every time your pay increases; it only happens when your pay increase moves you to a different pay band.

For example:

Employee Promotion

Mike’s current benefits eligible pay is $47,000, placing him in the third benefits pay band. Mike received a promotion and a $5,000 increase to his annual salary, changing his benefits eligible pay to $52,000 and moving him into the fourth pay band for purposes of enrolling in medical benefits for the 2021 plan year.

Because Mike is moving into a higher benefits pay band, what he pays to enroll in the HDHP at the employee only coverage level will increase in the 2021 plan year in comparison to what he would have paid for the same coverage when he enrolled during the 2020 plan year.

  • When Mike was in the third benefits pay band, his payroll deductions were $79.38 per month during the 2020 plan year.
  • Now that he has moved into the fourth benefits pay band, his payroll deductions will be $103.49 per month – a total increase in premiums of $289.32 for the 2021 plan year.

This means that about $300 of Mike’s $5,000 raise will go towards his cost for medical coverage in 2021.

Employee Bonus

Cheryl’s current benefits eligible pay is $98,000, placing her in the fifth benefits pay band. Cheryl received a $5,000 bonus earlier this year, increasing her benefits eligible pay to $103,000 and moving her into the sixth pay band for purposes of enrolling in medical benefits for the 2021 plan year. While Cheryl did not receive a pay raise, the bonus she received counts towards her benefits eligible pay and increases her overall pay.

Because Cheryl is moving into a higher benefits pay band, what she pays to enroll her family in the ChoicePlan 500 will increase in the 2021 plan year in comparison to what she would have paid for the same coverage during the 2020 plan year.

  • When Cheryl was in the fifth benefits pay band, her payroll deductions would have been $528.69 per month.
  • Now that she’s moved into the sixth benefits pay band, her payroll deductions will be $713.73 per month – a total increase in premiums of $2,220.50 for the 2021 plan year.

This means that about $2,200 of Cheryl’s $5,000 bonus will go towards her cost for medical coverage in 2021.